Taxation & Tax reform Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Emile Woolf writes

High taxation will always stifle growth

We crave stability as much as we abhor uncertainty but, on every front, inbuilt contradictions render conventional solutions to economic problems unsustainable. They need to be jettisoned. You can’t kick the proverbial can further down the road when the road is a cul-de-sac. public sector superstructure that, despite all talk of cuts, is still bloated. […]

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Sustainable recovery: reform the taxes – or miss the opportunity

‘’No wind is fair to a man who does not know for which port he is making’’ (Seneca, AD1 to 65). Assuming this is valid for governments too, is the coalition rudderless? The deficit is being brought under control; “public servants’’ are being reminded what that phrase means; quangos are being ditched; and the process […]

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Axing the quangos and reforming the tax structure – both are needed

The proliferation of quangos under the previous administration contributed hugely to the deficit that has all but crippled public finances in the UK. Funded out of taxes, they were launched without reference to any democratic process, often in the wake of pointless Whitehall requirements or EU directives. The rash of self-important job creation that gripped […]

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Tax and accounting are the drivers: but where are they taking us?

Purists maintain that accounting and taxation should be neutral in terms of economic impact. Decision-making should be based on what’s good for the business – for its customers, staff and shareholders – without distortion by complex tax and accounting rules. But we have strayed: there is scarcely a decision untainted by daunting tax or accounting […]

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Reduce the deficit? Then reduce waste in public finances

The question of public sector finances has descended into an irrational bunfight. Watch the “contestants” hurl abuse at each other on “Question Time”. Last month I was invited by Eddie Mair of Radio 4’s PM programme to comment on the level of senior salaries in the public sector. My observation that taxes raised from the […]

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Paying for infrastructure – learning from others

The economics of infrastructure funding is a fascinating subject, particularly when we observe how it varies from one country to another. How to select projects from the dozens that compete for public favour? By what criteria are they deemed worthwhile and prioritized? And, most critically, how are those selected to be financed? On my travels […]

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Hong Kong and China: reconciling the economic incongruities

Having been writing, seemingly forever, on professional matters and wider economic issues, it’s time for a refreshing break – for me at least. I am writing on the high seas, visiting many fascinating places – Guam, Papua New Guinea, the Great Barrier Reef. But the most intriguing are Hong Kong and China. I shall say […]

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